In 2009, businesswoman Catarina Portas teamed up with architect João Regal to restore the kiosks in five downtown areas in #Lisbon, #Portugal. A concept originally imported from Paris, the kiosks date back to the 19th century. They were places where people stopped on their way elsewhere, to momentarily quench their thirst and hunger, talk about their day, and buy lottery tickets, tobacco, and newspapers. In addition -- according to the first kiosk planning application in 1867 -- the structure's duty was to "beautify the street." (Photo courtesy of Richard John Seymour for The Spaces) http://cnn.it/1Tz76Ks



In 2009, businesswoman Catarina Portas teamed up with architect João Regal to restore the kiosks in five downtown areas in #Lisbon, #Portugal. A concept originally imported from Paris, the kiosks date back to the 19th century. They were places where people stopped on their way elsewhere, to momentarily quench their thirst and hunger, talk about their day, and buy lottery tickets, tobacco, and newspapers. In addition -- according to the first kiosk planning application in 1867 -- the structure's duty was to "beautify the street." (Photo courtesy of Richard John Seymour for The Spaces) http://cnn.it/1Tz76Ks
In 2009, businesswoman Catarina Portas teamed up with architect João Regal to restore the kiosks in five downtown areas in #Lisbon, #Portugal. A concept originally imported from Paris, the kiosks date back to the 19th century. They were places where people stopped on their way elsewhere, to momentarily quench their thirst and hunger, talk about their day, and buy lottery tickets, tobacco, and newspapers. In addition -- according to the first kiosk planning application in 1867 -- the structure's duty was to "beautify the street." (Photo courtesy of Richard John Seymour for The Spaces) http://cnn.it/1Tz76Ks In 2009, businesswoman Catarina Portas teamed up with architect João Regal to restore the kiosks in five downtown areas in #Lisbon, #Portugal. A concept originally imported from Paris, the kiosks date back to the 19th century. They were places where people stopped on their way elsewhere, to momentarily quench their thirst and hunger, talk about their day, and buy lottery tickets, tobacco, and newspapers. In addition -- according to the first kiosk planning application in 1867 -- the structure's duty was to "beautify the street." (Photo courtesy of Richard John Seymour for The Spaces) http://cnn.it/1Tz76Ks Reviewed by FHMWeb on 10:22 Rating: 5

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